Each state in the US has different divorce laws and regulations. Sometimes, even different counties in the same state can have slightly different divorce laws or policies. Because marriage is a legal contract, dissolving it requires a legal action, but the particular laws and processes to do this vary from state to state. Understanding how divorce laws in your state relate to you and your situation is critical for a smooth, hassle-free divorce (yes, there is such a thing as a smooth divorce!). We want you to go to court with a firm grasp of how the divorce guidelines in your state can affect your case. To this end, we have condensed the most relevant divorce laws in your state and compiled a summary below. We hope this information helps you.

Alabama – You must have lived in the state for six months or more before filing divorce. You can file either a No-Fault or a Fault divorce in Alabama. Alabama follows the “equitable distribution” model of property distribution. No Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the court in order to file for divorce. To learn more about Alabama’s divorce guidelines, click here.

Alaska – There is no residency time length to get a divorce in Alaska, although if you are in the military you must have lived in Alaska for 30 days prior to filing. Alaska allows divorce petitioners to file on either No-Fault or Fault grounds. The state applies an equitable distribution model to property division; no Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Alaska State Guidelines by clicking here.

Arizona – You must have lived in the state for at least 90 days prior to filing for your divorce. Arizona courts acknowledge only No-Fault grounds for divorce. They apply what is called “community distribution” to the division of the marriage estate. Furthermore, Arizona requires a Parenting Plan to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Arizona State Guidelines by clicking here.

Arkansas – You must have lived in Arkansas for at least 60 days before filing for your divorce. get an Arkansas online divorce you need to live in the state for 60 days before filing for a divorce. Arkansas Divorce Law offers both No-Fault and Fault divorces. It applies an equitable distribution model to the division of the marriage estate and its property. Arkansas does not require a Parenting Plan to be on file with the divorce. To learn more about the Arizona State Guidelines please click here.

California – You must have lived in California for at least six months prior to filing for divorce. You can file on either No-Fault or Fault grounds. California applies a community distribution model to the division of marital property. It does not require a Parenting Plan to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about California State Guidelines by clicking here.

Colorado – You must have lived in the state for at least 90 days prior filing for divorce. You can only file for a No-Fault divorce in Colorado. The state uses an equitable distribution model for the division of marital property. If you have children, the state requires a Parenting Plan to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Colorado State Guidelines by clicking here.

Connecticut – You must have lived in Connecticut for at least a year prior to filing for divorce. You can claim either Fault or No-Fault as grounds for your divorce. Connecticut uses an equitable distribution model to divide the marital estate. A Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Connecticut State Guidelines by clicking here.

Delaware – You must have lived in Delaware for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce. Arizona allows both Fault and No-Fault grounds. Arizona applies the community distribution model to the division of your marriage estate. No Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Delaware State Guidelines by clicking here.

District of Columbia – You must have lived in DC for at least six months prior to filing. You can cite either Fault or No-Fault grounds for your divorce. The District uses the equitable distribution model to divide your marital estate. It does require a Parenting Plan on file with the divorce. Learn more about the District of Columbia State Guidelines by clicking here.

Florida – You must have lived in Florida for at least six months prior to filing. Florida allows you to cite Fault or No-Fault as grounds for your divorce. Florida applies an equitable distribution model to the division of the marital estate. A Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Florida State Guidelines by clicking here.

Georgia – You must have lived in Georgia for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce. You can cite either Fault or No-Fault grounds for your divorce. Georgia applies an equitable distribution model to the division of all marital property; no Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Georgia State Guidelines by clicking here.

Hawaii – You must have lived in Hawaii for at least six months prior to filing for divorce. You can file either Fault or No-Fault divorces in Hawaii. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Hawaii State Guidelines here.

Idaho – To get an Idaho online divorce you need to live in the state for six weeks before filing for a divorce. Idaho Divorce Law offers both Fault and No-Fault divorces. They use a community property distribution of property and do not require a Parenting Plan to be on file with the divorce. To learn more about the Idaho State Guidelines please click here.

Illinois – You must have lived in Illinois for at least 90 days prior to filing for divorce. You can file either a No-Fault or Fault divorce. Illinois uses an equitable distribution model to divide your marital property. A Parenting Plan needs to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Illinois State Guidelines here.

Indiana – You must have lived in Indiana for at least six months and your current county for at least three months prior to filing for a divorce. Indiana offers both No-Fault and Fault divorces. Indiana uses an equitable distribution model to divide your marriage estate. A parenting plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Indiana State Guidelines here.

Iowa – You must have lived in Iowa for at least one year prior to filing. Iowa offers both No-Fault and Fault grounds for divorce; if you have children, a Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Iowa uses an equitable distribution model to divide marital property. Learn more about Iowa State Guidelines here.

Kansas – You must have lived in Kansas for at least 60 days prior to filing for divorce. Kansas allows both No-Fault or Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of the marriage estate. You must submit a Parenting Plan with the divorce if you have children. Learn more about the Kansas State Guidelines here.

Kentucky – You must have lived in Kentucky for at least 180 days prior to filing for divorce. Kentucky acknowledges only one no-fault ground for all divorces (irretrievable breakdown of the marriage). The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. You are not required to submit a Parenting Plan with the divorce. Learn more about Kentucky State Guidelines here.

Louisiana – You must have lived in Louisiana for at least one year prior to filing. Louisiana Divorce Law allows you to claim either Fault or No-Fault grounds for divorce. The state applies a community property model to the division of marital property. You do not have to have a Parenting Plan on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Louisiana State Guidelines here.

Maine – You must have lived in Maine for at least six months before you can file for divorce. Maine allows you to file either No-Fault or Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of the marriage estate. You do not have file a Parenting Plan with the divorce. Learn more about the Maine State Guidelines here.

Maryland – If the grounds occurred outside of Maryland, you must live in the state for at least one year before you can file. If the grounds occurred in the state, you can file in the county in which you reside. You can file either a Fault or No-Fault divorce. Maryland applies an equitable distribution model to the marriage estate and no Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Maryland State Guidelines here.

Massachusetts – You must live in Massachusetts if the grounds for the divorce occurred in the state (there is no length of residency requirement). Otherwise, you must have lived in the state for at least one year prior to filing. You can file either a No-Fault or a Fault divorce. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. You do not have to file a Parenting Plan with your divorce. Learn more about the Massachusetts State Guidelines here.

Michigan – You must have lived in Michigan for at least 180 days prior to filing for a divorce. Michigan only accepts No-Fault divorce grounds. It is an equitable distribution state and will apply that model to the division of your marital property. A Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Michigan State Guidelines here.

Mississippi – You must have lived in Mississippi for at least six months prior to filing for divorce. Mississippi divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorce. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce

Missouri – You must have lived in Missouri for 90 days prior to filing for divorce. Missouri only acknowledges No-Fault grounds for divorce. It uses an equitable distribution model to divide the marital property; a Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Missouri State Guidelines here. Learn more about the Mississippi State Guidelines here.

Montana – You must have lived in Montana for at least 90 days before you can file for a divorce. Montana only acknowledges No-Fault grounds for divorce. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of the marriage estate. A Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Montana State Guidelines here.

Nebraska – You must have lived in Nebraska for at least one year before you can file for divorce. Nebraska Divorce Law allows both No-Fault or Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Nebraska State Guidelines here.

Nevada – You must have lived in Nevada for at least six weeks before you can file for divorce. Nevada allows both Fault and No-Fault grounds for divorce. The state applies the community property model to the division of the marital estate. Nevada does not require a Parenting Plan to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Nevada State Guidelines here.

New Hampshire – You must have lived in New Hampshire for at least one year before filing your online divorce. New Hampshire Divorce Law allows either No-Fault or Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. Learn more about the New Hampshire State Guidelines here.

New Jersey – You must have lived in New Jersey for at least one year before filing your online divorce. New Jersey divorce law offers both No-Fault or Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. It is not necessary to have a Parenting Plan on file with the divorce. Learn more about the New Jersey State Guidelines here.

New Mexico – You must have lived in New Mexico for at least six months prior to filing your online divorce. New Mexico Divorce Law allows both Fault and No-Fault divorces. The state applies a community property model to the division of marital property. No Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the New Mexico State Guidelines here.

New York – You must have lived in New York of at least one year prior to filing your online divorce. New York divorce law allows both No-Fault or Fault divorces. They use an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. You are not required to have a Parenting Plan on file with the divorce. Learn more about New York State Guidelines here.

North Carolina – You must have lived in North Carolina for at least six months prior to filing your online divorce. North Carolina divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. No Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the North Carolina State Guidelines here.

North Dakota – You must have lived in North Dakota for at least six months prior to filing for an online divorce. North Dakota divorce law allows either Fault and No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the New Dakota State Guidelines for divorce here.

Ohio – You must have lived in Ohio for at least six months prior to filing your online divorce. Ohio divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. It is not required to have a Parenting Plan on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Ohio State Guidelines here.

Oklahoma – You must have lived in Oklahoma for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce. Oklahoma divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Oklahoma State Guidelines here.

Oregon – You must have lived in Oregon for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce. Oregon divorce law allows both No-Fault and Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan, if necessary, is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Oregon State Guidelines here.

Pennsylvania – You must have lived in Pennsylvania for at least six months prior to filing your online divorce. Pennsylvania divorce law allows both No-Fault and Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Pennsylvania State Guidelines here.

Rhode Island – You must have lived in Rhode island for at least one year prior to filing for your online divorce. Rhode Island divorce law offers Fault and No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about Rhode Island divorce law here.

South Carolina – You must have lived in South Carolina for at least three months prior to filing for your online divorce. South Carolina divorce law allows both No-Fault and Fault divorces. The state uses an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required when filing the divorce papers. Learn more about the South Carolina State Guidelines here.

South Dakota – You must live in South Dakota to get a divorce in the state — there is no length of residency requirement. South Dakota divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan, if applicable, is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the South Dakota State Guidelines here.

Tennessee – You must have lived in Tennessee for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce. Tennessee Divorce Law allows either Fault and No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of property. A Parenting Plan, if applicable, is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Tennessee state guidelines here.

Texas – You must have lived in Texas for at least six months prior to your divorce as well as the county in which you reside for three months prior to filing for your divorce. Texas applies a community property model to the division of the marital estate. If applicable, a Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Tennessee State Guidelines here.

Utah – You must have lived in Utah for at least three months prior to filing for a divorce. Utah divorce law allows both No-Fault and Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. When applicable, a Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Utah State Guidelines here.

Vermont – You must have lived in Vermont for at least six months prior to filing your divorce. Vermont divorce law allows either No-Fault or Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A parenting plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Vermont State Guidelines here.

Virginia – You must have lived in Virginia for at least six months prior to filing for a divorce. Virginia divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Virginia State Guidelines here.

Washington – You must live in Washington to file for a divorce — there is no length of residency requirement. Washington divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. If applicable, a Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Washington State Guidelines here.

West Virginia – You must have lived in West Virginia for at least one year prior to filing your divorce, although if you were married in West Virginia the one year requirement is waived. West Virginia divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. If applicable, a Parenting Plan is required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the West Virginia State Guidelines here.

Wisconsin – You must have lived in Wisconsin for at least six months prior to filing your online divorce. Wisconsin divorce law allows you to file only No-Fault divorces. The state applies a community property model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Wisconsin State Guidelines here.

Wyoming – You must have lived in Wyoming for at least 60 days prior to filing for your divorce. Wyoming divorce law allows either Fault or No-Fault divorces. The state applies an equitable distribution model to the division of marital property. A Parenting Plan is not required to be on file with the divorce. Learn more about the Wyoming State Guidelines here.